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Best practice in care environments: Seeing people in later life as individuals, not as conditions.

My Home Life’s very own Professor Julienne Meyer was recently interviewed by Anna Melville James for The Elder Magazine about Best Practice in Care Environments: Seeing People in Later Life as Individuals, Not as Conditions.

Julienne is the executive director of My Home Life, she is passionate about best practice in care environments. Julienne spoke with Anna about the importance of relationships of all kinds in the care space – and the positive power of involving people in their own care decisions. Here what Julienne had to say…

What inspires you about working in the later life space?

I’m passionate about inequalities, and you’ll always find me working at the margins. I feel the need to champion older people’s issues because I think ageism is rife in our society.

It’s probably not surprising then that I’m working with frailty and dementia, in care homes and at the end of life – I’m always looking at the sorts of places where not everybody chooses to go.

I think increasingly people are recognising the ageing population is presenting challenges that we all need to be thinking about and addressing because it’s going to affect us all. It’s not a case of “them”. Ageing is actually about “us”.

In terms of inequality, is there a sense that older people don’t often have a voice, especially in the case of their care needs?

Yes, because we’re an ageist society, we tend not to see older people as individuals, and really listen to what their needs might be. There are many other contributing reasons too – one of those being that not everybody wants to engage with this, possibly because they fear their own ageing and frailty. I think sometimes people don’t want to think about it until it affects them personally.

A lot of my work is about awareness and helping to see people as individuals, rather than as conditions. I look at the importance of involving them in decision-making about finding out what they want and what matters to them.

“For person-centred care to be delivered, we’ve not only got to think about the needs of older people but also, the needs of relatives who visit and the staff who work there.”

What is the biggest area for improvement in care at the moment?

Well, we have to recognise the funding crisis, which is just massive. That has to be the biggest issue to be addressed and improved. But for me, improvement is also about what we can do in the situation in which we find ourselves now.

People talk about person-centred care, but I don’t think we’ll ever really get to that unless we pay attention to relationships between residents, relatives and staff. I do a lot of work in care homes, and I feel that for person-centred care to be delivered, we’ve got to not only think about the needs of older people but also, the needs of relatives who visit and the staff who work there.

If we don’t think about the needs of staff, how are they going to meet the needs of residents and relatives? We’ve got to value and respect the work that they do because often the care workforce is very marginalised and stereotyped.

We also need to think about the relationships between care homes and their local communities and help the public engage with care homes more. And we need to think about care homes and the broader health and social care system, and how we can better support care homes to deliver quality services for older people.

What are the principles of best practice for you?

I’m drawing on the work of My Home Life here because that’s been a big focus for the last ten years, but I’ve worked in all care environments, and I think best practice is a set of principles that can be applied across a whole range of settings and ages.

My Home Life draws on four conceptual frameworks, and one of those is about developing best practice together. We pulled together the evidence for best practice at the start, by asking ‘What do we know older people want and what works?’

“Everyone’s business should be connecting with the most vulnerable citizens in our society – and there’s lots that we can learn from doing so.”

Within these there are eight themes, three of which I’ve already mentioned – maintaining identity, sharing decision-making, and creating community. The others are about managing transitions, improving health and healthcare, and supporting good end of life. We also need to think about keeping the workforce fit for purpose and promoting positive cultures.

Another framework draws on Mike Nolan’s work, looking at how what individuals have to say matters to them. He themed it around the fact that intrinsically, we all – whether you’re a resident, a relative, staff member or visiting student nurse – have a need to feel a sense of security, belonging, continuity, purpose, achievement and significance.

So we use that framework and encourage care home managers to think about it in care planning, appraisals, or in their interaction with relatives.

A third conceptual framework is focused on appreciative inquiry – and pays a lot of attention to the use of language. In traditional problem-solving scenarios, instead of seeing things as problems, the conversation begins with what’s working well and asking how we support that to continue. We can then envision how we’d like things to be, and how to work with others to realise that vision.

The last framework is about having caring conversations, and I think this is the most important one because if we all did this, the other frameworks would probably fall into place.

This draw’s on Belinda Dewar’s work and places emphasis on celebrating what’s working well, connecting emotionally and asking people about feelings, because we often don’t. I think having caring conversations helps us not only to find out what individuals want but can guide how we work together to deliver that. We need to be more curious and less judgmental.

Our thanks goes to all those who were involved in the creation and publication of this article. Special thanks to Anna Melville James, Claire Bergins and The Elder magazine. Please see the original article for further details on The Elder magazine Best Practice in Care Environments: Seeing People in Later Life as Individuals, Not as Conditions

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Welcome to the new My Home Life blog

Hello and welcome to our new blog and our first ever blog post. On this blog we want to host stories from people who are working in and around care homes every day. All residents, relatives, staff, and visitors to care homes are welcome to contribute – as are those from the wider health, social care, housing networks (including commissioners) that work with care homes. We’ll also occasionally feature points of view from regional and national organisations.

I don’t have anything to share…

We’re interested in hearing about all the beautiful moments in care – from the smallest thing that has made a difference to just one of your residents – to the huge projects which took months of planning. One of the things that makes a real difference in the conversations we have is being able to relate back to what is happening in real life, in our care homes, everyday all over the country.

We might occasionally suggest that you change a few details to protect identities – but if you have a real story about good quality of life in care homes, we won’t say no.

Far too busy for this!

If you’re thinking that you’ve got a story that you’d like to share- something exciting happening in your care home – or some really good tips that have been really helpful to you – but there’s no way you have time to write a post (or blogging really isn’t your thing) – then let us know. We know how busy life in care homes can be and how difficult it is to justify the time to do something (anything!) else. We’re happy to have a quick chat with you on the phone, ask you a few questions about the story you’d like to share. Then we’d write it up as a post, run it past you to check you’re happy and put it up on the site for you.

We want to hear from you

We’re keen to hear your stories so if you’re doing something in your care home or local area that you’d like to share, please get in touch on 0207 040 0260 or mhl@city.ac.uk

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"Best practice in care environments: Seeing people in later life as individuals, not as conditions."

My Home Life’s very own Professor Julienne Meyer was recently interviewed by Anna Melville James for The Elder Magazine about Best Practice in Care Environments: Seeing People in Later Life as Individuals, Not as Conditions. Julienne is the executive director of My Home Life, she is passionate about best practice in care environments. Julienne spoke […]

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